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Art Basel 2017 Art

(Clockwise, from top left) Reza Aramesh, Site of the Fall: Study of the Renaissance Garden, 2016-17, marble, topiary, Leila Heller, New York City, at Parcours, ArtBasel ; Sue Williamson, Messages from the Atlantic Passage, Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa; Phyllida Barlow, untitled: 100banners2015, 2015, Hauser & Worth, Zurich; Thomas Struth, Paradise 28, Rio Madre de Dios, Peru 2005, 2005, chromogenic print, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin/Paris; Peter Regli, Reality Hacking No. 313, 2014, Levy Gorvy, New York.


THE MORNING AFTER: LOOKING BACK AT ART BASEL 2017

This year, Art Basel had something for everyone. Dominated by the motherlode of over 4,000 works of art shown by 226 exhibitors in the Galleries sector, Art Basel extended its universe to individual artist projects at Parcours, Unlimited, Statements and Features. The solo projects, the result of artist proposals, were politically aware, environmentally conscious and community oriented.


Subodh Gupta "Cooking the World”

Subodh Gupta, "Cooking the World” 2017, found aluminum utensils, monofilament line, steel, Gallery Continua, Italy.


ARTSCOPE’S GUIDE TO BASEL ART FAIRS 2017

It is a calmer year at Art Basel, but no less edgy. Escapist to a degree, the world sector-wide reflects a desire to hide under the covers, or at least spend time at a beach, eating a good meal or watching an entertaining, possibly animated film. Whereas the work last year implored us to speak an act, and sometimes revolt, we’ve now done it, and largely have had no effect. So, let’s have some fun. Many projects allow us just that.


Art Basel Art 2017

(Clockwise, from top left) Reza Aramesh, Site of the Fall: Study of the Renaissance Garden, 2016-17, marble, topiary, Leila Heller, New York City, at Parcours, ArtBasel ; Sue Williamson, Messages from the Atlantic Passage, Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa; Phyllida Barlow, untitled: 100banners2015, 2015, Hauser & Worth, Zurich; Thomas Struth, Paradise 28, Rio Madre de Dios, Peru 2005, 2005, chromogenic print, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin/Paris; Peter Regli, Reality Hacking No. 313, 2014, Levy Gorvy, New York.


ARTSCOPE AT ART BASEL SWITZERLAND: DAY TWO

First confronted by Al Wei Wei’s “Iron Tree” (2016), which changes patina as it ages, it also brings nature and the manmade relationship with nature into perspective. That relationship seems a theme of Parcours, curator Samuel Leuenberger’s brilliant trek through the city through the following of artwork installations. Reza Aramsh recreates Michelangelo’s “Slave” in resin, but tiesits hands behind his back with a rope, making him captive and towering on a plinth over the river. Katinka Bock’s “Parasite Fountain” (2017) creates ametal fish that draws water from a neighboring fountain, thus the parasite description, and does not give it back. It uses the water for itself. Politics has come into the work now.


Art Basel Entrance

Art Basel Entrance


ARTSCOPE AT ART BASEL SWITZERLAND: DAY ONE

Done with the hard-hitting political landscape of last year’s work here, and taking a breather, maybe literally, everyone’s happier seeing fewer political statement or in your face art. A lot is concentrating on the process, the materials and the bringing in of concrete, beads, aluminum screening and more for innovative treatments of material.


Clemens Kalischer and Familly

Clemens Kalischer and family at the opening reception for his “Between Past and Future: Clemens Kalischer’s Vermont” exhibition at Bennington Museum (photo by Marguerite Serkin).


Between Past and Future: Clemens Kalischer’s Vermont at Bennington Museum

Bennington Museum hosted an artist reception on the afternoon of June 3rd to honor legendary photographer Clemens Kalischer. Now on view in the museum’s ground floor gallery, “Between Past and Future: Clemens Kalischer’s Vermont” provides a wide sampling of Mr. Kalischer’s masterfully- composed portraits that span more than six decades of Vermont life.


Bruce Rosenbaum Standing in his workshop

Bruce Rosenbaum Standing in his workshop.


CORNERED: STEAMPUNK REIMAGINEER BRUCE ROSENBAUM

On September 10, “New Sole of the Old Machine: Steampunk Brockton, Reimagining the City of Shoes” opens at the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, Mass. Curated by Steampunk ReImagineer Bruce Rosenbaum, founder of ModVic, LLC, the exhibition features work by John Belli, Jim Bremer & Ruth Buffington, David Lang, Susan Montgomery, Janel Norris, Sam Ostroff, Bruce Rosenbaum and Michael Ulman. The show’s opening reception is this Sunday, September 11 from 2-5 p.m. Last month, Titilayo Ngwenya, the museum’s director of communications, interviewed Rosenbaum prior to the show’s opening.


Nick Cave, "Soundsuit," 2009.


First Light Shines at the ICA

Despite the surge in identity-interested art production that occurred in the 1990s — a time when some artists were thinking specifically about inequality within the art world itself — there are still art museums in the United States that have a problem with diversity and inclusion. This is not so at the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston


"Poverty: Nugget Mania and Ploughman"

"Poverty: Nugget Mania and Ploughman," 2009 30 1/2” x 46”. Oil on Mi-Teintes.


Brewster’s Quixotic Encounters

David Brewster exemplifies, in an extraordinary way, how American regionalism has evolved and continues to manifest into the contemporary realm. He is a master of formal and trained juxtapositions and dichotomies. In his paintings, Brewster combines the power of midcentury action and expressive mark-making — contemporary forms of plein air production — with the narrative intellectualism of scene painting, capturing and interpreting, from a personal perspective, the nuances of a specific time and place.


NAWA at Endicott

Ronnie Gould, "Habitat Clash," clay sculpture, 7” x 12”, in front of "Breaking Ground" installation featuring (from left to right) Merry Beninato, "The Artist’s Palate" ; Lully Schwartz, "Watteau Fete Galante" ; Beverly Rippel," Studio Contemplation" ; Kat Massela, "Circle of Life" ; Kim Alemian, "Turned"; Jennifer Jean Costello, "Love Locks" ; Susan Scavo Gallagher, "Electrifying" ; Linda Talanian, "Midlife Crisis" ; and Linda Lippa, "Women in Squares" .


Feminine Influence

“Breaking Ground,” a presentation of 55 conceptually and materially diverse works of art — painting, photography, ceramics, fiber, printmaking, mixed-media, sculpture and bronze — by 46 contemporary women artists of the Massachusetts chapter of the National Association of Women Artists, Inc. (NAWA) asks: “Does being a woman artist influence your style, subject and or medium?”


Triple Self-Portrait

Miriam Laufer, "Triple Self Portrait" (collection of Robert D. Speiser; photo courtesy of PAAM).


Provincetown in Autumn

The Provincetown Art Association and Museum (PAAM) is at the very tip of Massachusetts (next stop: Azores) with a cultural impact that is extraordinary. In its 102nd year, the vitality of the museum and school can be measured by the 250 volunteers who support a highly effective staff stewarded by director Chris McCarthy. Under her direction, PAAM is much larger than its physical size and location, reaching around the globe with its membership and quality of shows.